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Robert Service – Maids in May

 

Robert Service described his own poetry as 'dogerell'. It was probably the self-effacing Scot in him which led him to this conclusion. His poetry was something I grew up with because my father loved Service's work and would often quote from it. There is hardly a Service poem which isn't either thought provoking, sad, funny or simply beautiful. 

Click Here to read a brief biography of Service and a complete list of his work. 

 

 

Maids in May

Three maids there were in meadow bright,
The eldest less then seven;
Their eyes were dancing with delight,
And innocent as Heaven.

Wild flowers they wound with tender glee,
Their cheeks with rapture rosy;
All radiant they smiled at me,
When I besought a posy.

She gave me a columbine,
And one a poppy brought me;
The tiniest, with eyes ashine,
A simple daisy sought me.

And as I went my sober way,
I heard their careless laughter;
Their hearts too happy with to-day
To care for what comes after.

    .    .    .    .    .    .    .

That's long ago; they're gone, all three,
To walk amid the shadows;
Forgotten is their lyric glee
In still and sunny meadows.

For Columbine loved life too well,
And went adventure fairing;
And sank into the pit of hell,
And passed but little caring.
While Poppy was a poor man's wife,
And children had a-plenty;
And went, worn out with toil and strife
When she was five-and-twenty.

And Daisy died while yet a child,
As fragile blossoms perish,
When Winter winds are harsh and wild,
With none to shield and cherish.

Ah me! How fate is dark and dour
To little Children of the Poor.

 

Robert Service – Bar Room Ballads

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